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Updated: 8 hours 38 min ago

What are systematic reviews?

Fri, 08/26/2016 - 00:27

 "What are systematic reviews?"

If you’re a Cochrane contributor and have ever attempted to explain Cochrane’s work to someone, chances are you’ve tried to answer this question. And if you’re reading this because you’re new to Cochrane and the work we do, you may be wondering about this too.

Thanks to a team of creative colleagues from Cochrane Consumers and Communication, we’re pleased to share a video resource which answers this question clearly and simply for people who may not be familiar with the concept of systematic reviews: what they are, how researchers prepare them, and why they’re an important part of making informed decisions about health - for everyone. You can find this video on Cochrane’s YouTube channel, and we hope you’ll share and spread the word about the importance of evidence!

 

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

What are systematic reviews?

Fri, 08/26/2016 - 00:27

 

"What are systematic reviews?"

If you’re a Cochrane contributor and have ever attempted to explain Cochrane’s work to someone, chances are you’ve tried to answer this question. And if you’re reading this because you’re new to Cochrane and the work we do, you may be wondering about this too.

Thanks to a team of creative colleagues from Cochrane Consumers and Communication, we’re pleased to share a video resource which answers this question clearly and simply for people who may not be familiar with the concept of systematic reviews: what they are, how researchers prepare them, and why they’re an important part of making informed decisions about health - for everyone. You can find this video on Cochrane’s YouTube channel, and we hope you’ll share and spread the word about the importance of evidence!

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Cochrane evidence on Tumblr

Mon, 08/01/2016 - 16:16

Browse through our Tumblr account and get a visual dose of Cochrane evidence!

Tumblr is a microblogging social networking website – a place where people post images and animated graphics. On our Cochrane Tumblr account, you can view visual summaries of Cochrane evidence.

If you have a Tumblr account, you can follow us to add Cochrane evidence to your feed. If you don’t have a Tumblr account, just stop by and browse by health area or language – we have posts in seven different languages!

Cochrane Tumblr: https://cochraneblogshots.tumblr.com/ 

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

2019 Journal Impact Factor for Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews is 7.890

Thu, 06/30/2016 - 10:54

 The 2019 Journal Citation Report (JCR) has just been released by Clarivate Analytics, and we are delighted to announce that Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Journal Impact Factor is now 7.890.

This is an increase on the 2018 Journal Impact Factor, which was 7.755.

The CDSR Journal Impact Factor is calculated by taking the total number of citations in a given year to all Cochrane Reviews published in the past 2 years and dividing that number by the total number of Reviews published in the past 2 years. It is a useful metric for measuring the strength of a journal by how often its publications are cited in scholarly articles.

Some highlights of the CDSR 2019 Journal Impact Factor include:

  • The CDSR is ranked 10 of the 165 journals in the Medicine, General & Internal category
  • The CDSR received 67,763 cites in the 2019 Journal Impact Factor period, compared with 67,607 in 2018
  • The 5-Year Journal Impact Factor is 7.974 compared with 7.949 in 2018

The main Journal Impact Report and the Cochrane Review Group reports will be delivered in August 2020.

 

Monday, June 29, 2020

International Clinical Trials' Day 2019

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 04:00

International Clinical Trials' Day is celebrated in 2019 on 20 May marking the day in 1747 on which James Lind is believed to have begun the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy which was common among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) International Clinical Trials' Day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of research to health care, and draw attention to ways in which the research can become more relevant to practice.

Learn about Cochrane systematic reviews and how clinical trials are used:


Find other relevant information and resources on Twitter by using the hashtag #ICTD2019.

Monday, May 20, 2019

International Clinical Trials' Day 2017

Thu, 05/19/2016 - 04:00

International Clinical Trials' Day is celebrated around the world each year on or close to 20 May, commemorating the day in 1747 on which James Lind began the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy then in common use among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) International Clinical Trials' Day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of research to health care, and draw attention to ways in which the research can become more relevant to practice.

The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN)helps to co-ordinate the annual commemoration, providing a focal point for international events, meetings, debates, and other celebrations of clinical research. The highlight of each year is a series of public lectures and discussions, held in a different European city. The 2017 celebrations are taking place on May 19th in Lisbon, Portugal. A range of speakers will present a variety of relevant topics, including ‘Data sharing and reuse: attitudes and practices in multinational clinical research’, with healthcare professionals and researchers from across Europe in attendance.

Learn about Cochrane systematic reviews and how clinical trials are used:


As part of our own commemoration of International Clinical Trials’ Day, Cochrane is highlighting a series of recent reviews using clinical study data and regulatory reports, as well as published reports in peer-reviewed journals:

Additional plerixafor to granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for haematopoietic stem cell mobilisation for autologous transplantation in people with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma

Blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin inhibitors for primary hypertension

Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

And learn more about the issues relevant to clinical research in the latest of our commemorating the event.

Post and find other relevant information and resources on Twitter by using the hashtag #ICTD2017.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Dying Matters Awareness Week

Mon, 05/09/2016 - 04:00

13 - 19 May 2018 is Dying Matters Awareness Week. Every year in May, Dying Matters and its coalition members host an Awareness Week, which gives an opportunity to place the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. The theme for 2019 is, "Are we ready?"

The Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Group produces reviews on palliative care for those with life-limiting disease or illness, and supportive care of patients and significant others living with serious illness. They have worked closely with Hospice UK, a national charity for hospice care, and the Dying Matters Coalition in order to share best evidence in palliative care during the Awareness Week.

The Cochrane evidence on this topic area are:

Other Related Resources:

Monday, May 13, 2019

Dying Matters Awareness Week

Mon, 05/09/2016 - 04:00

14 - 20 May 2018 is Dying Matters Awareness Week. Every year in May, Dying Matters and its coalition members host an Awareness Week, which gives an opportunity to place the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. The theme for 2018 is, "What Can You Do... in your community?"

The Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Group produces reviews on palliative care for those with life-limiting disease or illness, and supportive care of patients and significant others living with serious illness. They have been working closely with Hospice UK, a national charity for hospice care, and the Dying Matters Coalition in order to share best evidence in palliative care during the Awareness Week.

The Cochrane evidence on this topic area are:

Other Related Resources:

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Wearing Cochrane evidence: a personal story of impact

Thu, 01/07/2016 - 13:08

Rebecca Selby, a mum of four, shares how a Cochrane Review impacted her family.

When I unexpectedly went into premature labour with our second son at a little under 32 weeks' gestation, I was given steroid injections to give his lungs the best possible chance in the outside world. George spent almost a month in intensive care when he was born, spending some time on full ventilation and on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), to help him to breathe. Throughout his time in hospital, George developed a series of infections and I am sure that the boost to his lungs from the steroid medication is what gave him the ability to overcome these difficulties and ultimately saved his life. It is unlikely that George would be our 12-year-old little boy now without the treatment that he received, a fact for which we will all be eternally grateful!

In September 2015 I started at The University of Manchester to study Biology with Science and Society. I learned about the meaning behind the Cochrane logo while conducting research over the course of my studies. Each horizontal line within the logo represents the results of one study, while the diamond shape represents the combined results. The best estimate of whether the treatment is effective or harmful is established in this way, through systematic review. In the Cochrane logo, the diamond sits clearly to the left of the vertical line. The diamonds’ position represents that treatment does not contribute to negative outcomes, which indicates that the treatment is beneficial. The visual representation of these results, the “forest plot”, within the Cochrane logo illustrates a systematic review (originally published by Crowley et al. and subsequently updated) that was influential in increasing use of corticosteroids in women who are about to give birth prematurely. This simple intervention has probably saved thousands of premature babies – including George.

I was really drawn to the symbolism in this logo and the personal connection I have with it. The fact that all signs from the individual trials indicated that the treatment had little to no benefit until you step back and put all of the trial outcome information together in a systematic review is brilliant.  Sometimes you need to step back and look at the bigger picture!  My husband has since incorporated the inner circle of the Cochrane logo into a tattoo, as a physical reminder of our own little miracle of medical science.

Thank you to all the Cochrane reviewers for making a difference to the lives of families, including mine.

Rebecca Selby (@BeccaSelby)

 

Hear from George in this video, starting at 3:45

Friday, November 1, 2019 Category: The difference we make

Cochrane & Evidence Aid: resources for earthquakes

Sun, 04/26/2015 - 20:08
This Cochrane Special Collection, developed in collaboration with Evidence Aid, includes Cochrane Reviews of healthcare topics that are important in the aftermath of a major earthquake. The reviews' conclusions are presented, along with signposts to systematic reviews that might be helpful to decision-makers. Topics covered: diarrhoea prevention and treatment; wound management; fracture management; physical trauma (excluding fractures); sepsis; anaesthesia; renal; chest infections; diseases caused by water-based insect vectors; mental health; neonatal health; child health and nutrition; and human resources for heallth. Access the full Special Collection on the Cochrane Library website. Monday, October 1, 2018

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